» Version française | Homepage

Posts tagged "foster care"


This post is the latest in a series of articles from guest bloggers. Each week experts and activists in fields of homelessness and mental health explore some of the issues raised by a Here At Home film.

From NFB interactive, Here At Home is a cutting-edge documentary experience that offers a look inside At Home, a radical experiment to end chronic homelessness. Led by the Mental Health Commission of Canada, the experiment is the largest of its kind in the world. The theory it’s testing: there’s a way to end homelessness for people with mental illness and it starts with giving them homes.

For today’s post we matched the Winnipeg film, “The Wound Inside,” with Julia Christensen, Research Fellow with the Institute for Circumpolar Health Research in Yellowknife and SSHRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Geography at the University of British Columbia. Born and raised in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, she explores colonial continuities in the Canadian North and their role in shaping northern homelessness.

The first time I watched “The Wound Inside” by Darryl Nepinak, I was struck at the outset when the film’s protagonist, Lukas, reflects on coming back to Winnipeg, only to be confronted by deep-seated racism he was perhaps naïve to in his younger years. I can relate to the discomfort and disappointment of realizing, for the first time, that a beloved place is flawed and not immune to the kinds of prejudice and exclusion that are easy to say exist somewhere else but not here. Growing up in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, I always felt a strong sense of community, and a kind of together-ness that stitched tight seams between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous inhabitants of the city. But more recently, when I moved back to my hometown, I saw the city with new eyes and understood for the first time that, like Winnipeg, the deep wound of colonialism persists unhealed.

(more…)

Facebook Twitter Email
Comments 0

This post is the second in a series of articles from guest bloggers. Each week experts and activists in fields of homelessness and mental health explore some of the issues raised by a Here At Home film.

For today’s post we matched the Winnipeg film, “3 Hots and a Cot” with Tim Richter, President & CEO of the Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness (CAEH). Richter led the implementation of Calgary’s 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness – the first plan of its kind in Canada. With the CAEH, he is now working to create a movement to prevent and end homelessness nation-wide.

The traditional approach to homelessness is grounded in an ideology that people should be self-sufficient and ‘pull themselves up by their bootstraps,’ earning housing through good behaviour, compliance and sobriety. It’s no small irony that this approach has had precisely the opposite effect to the one desired.

The entrenched worldview in so many of our social services today (aptly named the ‘Sorrow Systems’ by an Aboriginal speaker I once heard) presumes disability, dysfunction and worthlessness in those it is supposed to care for.

(more…)

Facebook Twitter Email
Comments 2