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Monthly archive June, 2013


For this, the final post on the Here At Home webdoc blog, we asked Stephen Gaetz for some final thoughts. Gaetz, who has written for us before, is director of the Canadian Homelessness Research Network and the Homeless Hub. These projects are dedicated to mobilizing homelessness research so that it has a greater impact on policy, planning and service provision, thereby contributing to solutions to end homelessness in Canada. Dr. Gaetz is also Associate Dean, Research and Professional Development in the Faculty of Education, York University, Toronto.

From NFB interactive, Here At Home is a cutting-edge documentary experience that offers a look inside At Home, a radical experiment to end chronic homelessness. Led by the Mental Health Commission of Canada, the experiment was the largest of its kind in the world. The theory it tested: there’s a way to end homelessness for people with mental illness and it starts with giving them homes. 

The At Home/Chez Soi project is a fantastic example of research impact.  For many years I have argued that our progress on ending homelessness has been impeded by a curious anti-intellectualism – people, often frustrated, would tell me: “We don’t need research – we know what the problem is, and we know what the solution is”.  I used to think: “Wrong! On all counts!”

Now in 2013, we are seeing how research really does matter!  Recently the Homeless Hub (Canadian Homelessness Research Network) in partnership with the Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness, released “The State of Homelessness in Canada – 2013”, the first national report card on homelessness.  The report paints a pretty grim picture.  At least 30,000 people are homeless in Canada on a given night, and minimally over 200,000 in a given year.  Many others are at risk, as we are suffering from an acute shortage of affordable housing in Canada.  Since the 1990s, we have seen incomes decline for approximately 40% of Canadians, and at the same time housing prices rise and low rent housing becomes more and more scarce.

I would argue that since that time we have become all too comfortable with the presence of homelessness in our communities.  In some cases it is our prejudices that permit us to not care; our belief that people who are homeless choose to be so, or are lazy, or just want to live on benefits (a national poll conducted for the Salvation Army in 2011 suggested as much).  The research does not support any of these beliefs.

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This post is the latest in a series of articles from guest bloggers. Each week experts and activists in fields of homelessness and mental health explore some of the issues raised by a Here At Home film.

From NFB interactive, Here At Home is a cutting-edge documentary experience that offers a look inside At Home, a radical experiment to end chronic homelessness. Led by the Mental Health Commission of Canada, the experiment is the largest of its kind in the world. The theory it’s testing: there’s a way to end homelessness for people with mental illness and it starts with giving them homes. 

For today’s post we matched the Vancouver film, “Waiting for Jon” with Jacqueline Kennelly, Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Carleton University. She is currently completing a 6 year qualitative study on the effects of the Olympic Games and its associated urban development projects on homeless youth in Vancouver, BC and London, UK.

In ‘Waiting for Jon,’ we follow Doug, the Peer Employment Coordinator at the Bosman Hotel in Vancouver, as he works with residents to facilitate their involvement in the daily upkeep of their home. The Bosman Hotel is not a hotel in the tourist sense of the word, but rather a supportive housing structure designed to assist the people who live there to put the pieces of their lives back together and keep them together. As Doug notes, the Bosman “should be the safety net for everyone”, there for those who need help transitioning out of a bad situation, and also there for those who simply cannot live successfully in traditional market housing. Its structure is highly aligned with the principles of ‘housing first’, where people are provided with the basic support that they need in terms of housing and support, which then enables them to take positive steps towards improving their own lives.

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This post is the latest in a series of articles from guest bloggers. Each week experts and activists in fields of homelessness and mental health explore some of the issues raised by a Here At Home film.

From NFB interactive, Here At Home is a cutting-edge documentary experience that offers a look inside At Home, a radical experiment to end chronic homelessness. Led by the Mental Health Commission of Canada, the experiment is the largest of its kind in the world. The theory it’s testing: there’s a way to end homelessness for people with mental illness and it starts with giving them homes. For today’s post we matched the Moncton film “Pray and Cry” with Jenna Sunkenberg, Senior Lecturer at the University of St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto.  Sunkenberg coordinates and teaches in the Cornerstone Program in Social Justice, a program focused on community engagement, student reflection and engaged dialogue.  Her current research and teaching practices integrate cultural theories of trauma and radical pedagogy.

The smile on Paul’s face in the last shot of this film is a testament to his spirit of humanity and survival.  To have experienced the trauma he suffered 25 years ago and still live with its aftermath in physical and psychological pain, the returning nightmares and body’s pains, yet to speak with such joy gives voice to his faith, perseverance and the success of programs such as At Home.  Programs of its kind are invaluable to contemporary culture, because they seek to remove the stigmas attached to mental health while simultaneously repairing the systemic injustices that our institutionalized power structures so often end up perpetuating on individual and societal levels.

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Here’s the second in a series of short takes on the five trial cities. Three stills, three quotes and nine stats. Click on any of the photos to go to the Vancouver page of our webdoc.

 

The still above is from the Here At Home film “Heart of Hell.” As Josh Evans says in his guest post about it, “After prolonged periods without housing, individuals pass a point of no return, becoming so adapted to street life that escape, from their point of view, is unimaginable.”

 

Filmmaker Lynne Stopkewich was hoping to shoot a portrait of Mr. MadDogg while he was out traplining. That didn’t work out so she ended up making the amazing film, “A Model Person.”

 

You only have to watch a few Here At Home films to realize that none of the stereotypes about homeless people are true.

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